Plan Your Viewing

 

PLAN YOUR VIEWING

The experience of a Total Eclipse is special and unique to each individual. Many will be able to recall their adventure for years to come. Make sure your story is one to remember with these handy hints on how to view the eclipse.

CHECK THE WEATHER

As the day draws nearer, keep a close eye on the weather reports. If the forecast for your town is cloudy, be prepared to move another location with more likelihood of clearer skies.

WHERE WILL YOU BE?

Decide whether you want to be amongst the crowds in a party atmosphere, or out in the wilderness with fewer distractions.
It helps to be away from trees and tall buildings so there are few obstructions from your view of the sky. It also helps to be on higher ground, where you can watch the shadow approach and, after totality, observe as it shoots off into the horizon.
Spectacular locations include the Grand Teton National Park and the Great Smoky Mountains National Park.

PHOTOGRAPHY

Advice from eclipse-watchers is: if this is your first eclipse, just watch and enjoy it all. 
Photographing an eclipse is an art, and unless you really know what you're doing, results can be very disappointing. You might have no worthwhile pictures after spending the whole time looking at the screen or through a lens when you could have been absorbing the whole experience. There will be loads of excellent photographs by experts after the event.

HOW TO VIEW THE ECLIPSE SAFELY

You must never look directly at the Sun without special certified eye protection. Ordinary sunglasses will not protect your eyes. Be sure to use your special protective viewers during all phases of the partial eclipse.

WHAT IF I'M NOT IN THE PATH OF TOTALITY?

Everyone in the United States, Canada, Central America and the northern countries of South America will experience a partial eclipse of the Sun, always an event to experience – but only with safe solar viewers.